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Case studies


The Old Station, Tintern, Chepstow


Project

Monmouthshire County Council contacted Easiaccess after other specialist contractors had tried and failed to come up with a practical solution to the unique scenario.  They needed ramped access to newly refurbished railway carriages, which now form a shop and tourist information centre. Creating a compliant disabled access route was complicated as the carriage finish floor level is a higher level to the underside of the carriage doors which would swing out therefore the ‘lip’ of the door was posing a unique and complex access problem. 

Outcome

Easiaccess are used to coming up with unique solutions, and this was no exception.  They came up with a solution that included a part fixed and part removable ramp, to solve the problem of the different levels of the carriage. The access ramp was installed and now provides not only wheelchair access but access for families with pushchairs.  The ramp also provides a landing between two of the carriage doors, allowing a wheelchair user to access either carriages. Wheelchair users can now enjoy the same facilities as other visitors.

Key Services

  • Installation
  • Onsite Planning
  • Survey & Technical Drawing
  • Working to Deadline

Testimonial 

“I discovered Easiaccess while researching for modular type ramps on the internet. I was looking for a particular system that was both practical and fully compliant with current building regulations. Having tried several other contractors, none could provide a more practical and safer solution than Easiaccess.

The cause of the problem was the significant difference between the floor level of the carriages and the underside of the carriage doors; therefore proving impossible to close the doors if a standard ramp were to be installed. Easiaccess however provided an alternative modular ramping system that was part fixed and part removable.

It is a unique ramped system which had proven challenging in order to ensure a practical and safe access. There would have been no other way in providing full access to all of the public.”

Daniel Sykes, Architectural Technologist, Monmouthshire County Council